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20130113
20130121
SHOW
STATION
CSPAN2 11
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English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2013 5:00pm EST
been studying how the radiation from fukushima has affected the environment. maybe you can give a summary what you have so far. >> yes, thank you, john. i would like to thank the organizers for being here. first visited fukushima in july of 2011 shortly after the disaster. and we spent about six weeks there since that time monitoring the movement of the contaminants and looking at the effect on the biological community. everything we have learned is new. it there's never been an event quite like this. there was twenty six years and we worked on that but the fukushima event and luckily was smaller, at least on the terrestrial side. we're thankful that are if that. the sorts things we've been looking at how are the insects, birds, microbes effected. are there measurable containment. and, you know, the first sets of results for preliminary published. we had a couple of paper published related to biodiversity as well as the major insect groups. the most striking thing to come from it is the level of variation among different groups. birds and butterflies, for instance, showed very s
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2013 12:00pm EST
and less risky environments. and how to reward those local governments and governments that actually take large responsibilities for mitigating risk, with their business and investment. >> thank you. we have time for just one more question, although i've got probably three hours of questions in front of me. this next one combines three, four cards, questions from the audience, and comes under the title of damned if you do and damned if you don't. and this is about -- one part was what happened to poor people who can't afford to own land? and craig, you dealt with this, and margareta also. also, some of these vulnerable areas are also economics where factories and infrastructure, corporations are in these areas. and that's part of what drives people to be there. so there's also and industrial and economic aspect to this. in part of the challenge about helping or not helping is an ethical question, as well as a legal question. so i would like each of you to just address that briefly if you could. >> here's how i would frame it. i've been into me places where i call them the proverbial one c
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2013 9:00am EST
growth a growth that is actually compatible with the sustainability of our environment and the fight against climate change. now, what does that mean for us? i remind you that in 2013 the imf is certainly stronger, better equipped financially, has certainly refined some of its analytical tools. we will continue to strengthen our surveyance, peps on spillover -- especially on spillover effects and on the financial sector. we will continue to strengthen our support for the entire spectrum of members through lending, capacity building, training, technical assistance. in other words, we are not only serving the needs of a selected group of countries, but we serve the entire membership. and when you look at the map of the world and see where our teams are whether it's in capacity building, in technical assistance, in programs associated or not with financing, we are all over the map. and we will continue to push ahead with the important and yet not completed reform of quota and governance which, as you know, includes three stages, two of which are completed, the third one not yet. and cer
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2013 12:00pm EST
their parents, their family and others and threatening them. and especially when you are in an environment of uncertainty, people say, well, international community might be leave, the security might deteriorate, so it's easier for these people to be intimidated and switch sides. also impersonation and using uniforms. i see a lot of people here that have been in kabul, and i've met them there. you can easily buy an afghan army uniform or police uniform on the market. you can even buy isaf uniforms if you're looking for it hard in kabul. so that's a part, but also copycat, mentally ill and unstable individuals like in here, sometimes you see what is an increase in the crime because people when they see something, they copy that. they think this is something cool or something acceptable. but, of course, rage and revenge, sometimes these soldiers are personally mistreated. but the last factor, of course s what they call jihad; thinking, of course, this is the right way of action. so so it's a complex phenomena, and i'm not going to go about how to deal with it. if needed, we can talk about it
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 9:00am EST
enough that it would allow people to start raising capital in this environment while meanwhile it gives you experience and time to get them right? >> well, i think -- good to see you, professor. i think that question goes specifically to the larger question of the problem with principles-based rules which, obviously, at the sec we're not used to. we're very prescriptive in our rulemaking. but i'll point out to you, though, too when we try if you look at the proposal on general solicitation, when things are a little more principles-based and flexible what we get back from industry, from lawyers, from, you know, trade groups is, please, give us a safe harbor with three easy steps and a checklist so that we can insure ourselves against liability both from the sec and civilly. and so there is oftentimes a press to get that sort of prescriptive rulemaking. so i just, quite frankly, i'm skeptical it would work because i don't know if folks would take the ball and run with it if there was, you know, a principles-based approach here. i think instead the sec, we -- the commission -- need to just
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 9:00am EST
that in a classroom environment with just a discussion. >> that's very important dynamics. >> so game changer, shale gas, regulation, barriers, culture, skill but i will talk about the hormones. dominant, mckinsey issue is sort of the cutting edge of looking at not only global manufacturing trends, but also trains but also trains in which are described as advanced industry. and this interesting interplay of production innovation. how do you see the landscape? >> very much with what you said at the beginning, the context of what transit is a, i think it is a shift going on. i think maybe we should start by saying too many of us, love manufacturing into one big category. there are at least five categories. i won't bore you with our views. i think the tip of it is advanced manufacturing, which is more using the data advanced materials, its nanotechnology. it's the combination of many other things, the innovation, the capabilities that this country is superbly good, the cross-cultural capability and as you said, it only is roughly around 11-12% of gdp, but it's extremely important flywheel. it accounts
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 12:00pm EST
, in a safe way, in a way that helps the environment, in a way that helps the economy and the local community and all of the above. but we've been an entitlement -- in entitlement processes around the country that have taken over 20 years. so if you think about projects -- and we're in one right now that i won't name exactly where it is, but it's been over 20 years. we have a project down in tampa, florida, that took us 21 years to open. so it's now the most successful shopping center in that region. it's created at least 3-4,000 permanent jobs. a huge spin-off and a huge catalyst for all kinds of growth. but why should it take us 21 years to do something that's really good? and i think that's the problem. you know, regulation is necessary, but regulation has to have its place. there has to be a balance. and, you know, sort of determining the size of government, a lot of people have said, it should be the people's will, but it doesn't feel that way. and bigger is not always better. and, you know, the idea of a faster and smarter government, you know, i said earlier is really sort of like an o
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 5:00pm EST
that is we create a regulatory environment, tax environment, and competitive regime here in this country that actually allows our businesses and workers to win in that global wheat competitive game at the moment. we have some extraordinary assets in this country. we have a highly educated and motivated work force that in many respects outperforms, not out educated about from a point of view workers in virtually every effort country. we have the most efficient capital markets in the world. our companies have the lowest cost of capital of any companies anywhere around the globe. we have a spirit of entrepreneurship and innovation and capitalist system and commitment to a capitalist system that is the envy of virtually every other country in the world, and we also have increasingly as elude it to in the earlier panel have always had a very strong natural resources, but with shale oil and gas and the incredible strength of our agricultural industry we have a great natural resources as well so there's a lot to be bullish about in this country in terms of our economic opportunities, but this f
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 12:00pm EST
constrained environment you wouldn't make. >> if i may need to the secretary of the needy or the chief of naval operations is to get more convictions. my mission is to ensure a fair, effective and efficient military justice system and has said, the officers are responsible for the safety, the welfare and the discipline within their command the of difficult leadership decisions to make and they make those decisions case by case, day in and day out and they try to do what's right in each case, not what's easy and what's expedient and not what is a perception of what is expected of that. >> i want to thank you all of the panelists. this concludes the briefing. it's been extremely informative to all of us, and we appreciate not only your service but your participation today. we know that there are veterans out in the back of the audience and we also want to acknowledge their service and commitment and involvement in today's process as members of the audience. i also want to personally thank the commission staff that put this together and highlight who did a spectacular job of putting toget
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2013 5:00pm EST
on handguns and it's a far even less regulated environment. so we take you quickly to a few studies that we've done that i think shows some very consistent patterns here with firearms of four accountability measures and the diversion of guns to criminals. the first one we published in general were ripping talf in 2009. it was a study where we took the crime done to 54 cities that had done the comprehensive trade practices, had been in place in those cities. we looked at the state down laws that in addition to that we actually did a survey of state and local law enforcement agencies to see whether what practices they engaged in with respect to the oversight of licensed gun dealers and we did some regression and all this is where we control for a number of factors including and the proximity to the other states with weak gun laws. when you look at the state having strong done the other registrations by itself and actually did not affect the diversion of guns to criminals. it was only having vose laws in concert with a practice of in those agencies audit inspections and oversight of those deal
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)